IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme

Pathways to Commercialisation

CCSA logo  UKCCSRC logo  IEAGHG Logo no strapline 

9th November 2015, One Birdcage Walk, London

You are invited to hold the date for a forthcoming workshop that will look at the pathways that will enable countries to move CCS to commercialisation. The last few years has seen a significant growth in the number of industrial-scale projects that are operating or under construction around the world. The lessons that have been learnt during the development and deployment of these early projects will be discussed, including projects from Brazil, Canada, US and UK.

The UK has set itself the ambition to commercialise CCS in the early 2020s and has supported that objective by introducing its Electricity Market Reform programme. To make CCS commercially competitive with other low carbon technologies it is recognised that there is a need to reduce costs. This meeting will explore both the UK’s perspectives on cost-reduction activities and compare this against the experience gained in other countries that are ahead of the UK in the early-commercial deployment of the technology. The meeting will examine cost reduction potential and activities in capture, transport (pipelines and shipping) and storage through technology developments, business models and industrial clusters.

Agenda 

09.30 - 10.15 Registration and Coffee

 10.15 - 10.30 Welcome and introduction: Kelly Thambimuthu, IEAGHG
 10.30 - 11.30 Panel 1: International experiences with CCS.  - Chair: Luke Warren, CCSA
  There is broad consensus that CCS will need to be widely deployed if national and global climate goals are to be successfully delivered. The last few years has seen a significant growth in the number of industrial-scale projects that are operating or under construction around the world. These include internationally significant projects that have applied CCS at both a greater scale and to new sectors thereby representing important milestones for the development of the technology.  This session will explore the lessons that have been learnt during the deployment of these early projects.  
 

The role of CCS in the broader energy system – Jo Coleman, Energy Technologies Institute
Panel
o US DoE - Jarad Daniels, US DoE (no slides)
o Quest, Peterhead, etc. – Tim Bertels, Shell
o White Rose – Peter Emery, Drax

 11.30 - 12.30 Panel 2: Delivering commercial deployment of CCS - Chair John Gale, IEAGHG.
  The UK has set itself the ambition to commercialise CCS in the early 2020s and has supported that objective by introducing its Electricity Market Reform programme which establishes the Contracts for Difference for CCS. To make CCS commercially competitive with other low carbon technologies it is recognised that there is a need to reduce the costs of the technology.  The UK has considered options for cutting the costs of CCS which include; innovative capture options, offshore CO2-EOR and infrastructure clustering amongst other options. The aim of this session will be to explore both what the UK is doing and balance that against the experience gained in other countries that are ahead of the UK in commercial deployment and capture innovation.
  CCS Commercialisation programme. - Tony Ripley, DECC
Panel
o Boundary Dam – Mike Monea, SaskPower (No slides)
o Norweigian Experience - Hans Jorg Fell, Gassnova 

12.30 - 13.30 Lunch

 13.30 - 14.00 Transitioning to Low Carbon: John Loughhead, DECC
 14.00 - 15.00 Panel 3. The technology behind recent developments in CCS. - Chair Jon Gibbins, UKCCSRC.
 11.30 - 11.50 The panel session will focus on what capture technology has been deployed in recent commercial plant demonstrations, what were the reasons for selecting each technology (reduced financial risk, technology maturity etc., was selected and if projects had to do it again what they make a different technology choice?
 11.50 -12.10

Technology Convergence for Post-Combustion Capture? - Richard Smith, Howden
Panel
o Boundary Dam 3 and on to 4&5, Mike Monea, SaskPower (no slides)
A US perspective on technology choice - Richard Rhudy, EPRI
Perspective from Emirates Steel Project/UAE - Mohammad Abu Zahra

15.00 -15.30 Coffee

 15.30 - 16.30 Panel 4 Realising the Storage Resource - Chair: Brian Allison, DECC
 14.20 - 14.40 The UK has an extensive geological resource base in the North Sea, like many countries this resource remains to a large degree under researched but it is critical to the deployment of CCS. The aim of this final panel will be to review what the UK has achieved in assessing the extent of its offshore resource base and explore what the UK can learn from other countries.
 14.40 - 15.00 •  Offshore storage: meeting the commercialisation challenge - Ward Goldthorpe, Crown Estates
Panel
Norwegian experience - Britta Paasch, Statoil,  – invited
Australian perspective -  John Kaldi, CO2CRC  - invited
o Oil industry perspective and WBCSD initiative - Dominque Copin, Total (no slides)
 16.30 - 16.45 Concluding remarks

Registration

Registration is by invitation only and free of charge REGISTER HERE

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