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Technology Collaboration Programme by IEA

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Discover the latest advances carbon capture and storage research

Technical Report

Building the Cost Curves for CO2 Storage: European Sector

  • 1 February 2005
  • Costs of CCUS
  • Storage

This report reviews the development of a CO2 storage cost curve for Europe. The study has been carried out by The Netherlands Geological Survey (TNO-NITG) in co-operation with the geological surveys of Britain (BGS) and Denmark and Greenland (GEUS).

Technical Report

Building the Cost Curves for CO2 Storage: North America

  • 1 February 2005
  • Costs of CCUS
  • Storage

This report reviews the development of a CO2 storage cost curve for North America, which covers on-shore USA and Canada. The study has been carried out by Battelle, USA in co-operation with the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board, Canada.

Technical Report

Monitoring Workshop – Inaugural Meeting

  • 1 March 2005
  • Event Proceedings
  • Storage

The objective of the workshop was to get a common understanding of the current state of the art, to identify the techniques available, and to assess their limitations. This was achieved by using the results available from projects that are currently monitoring injected CO2. The aim was then to develop a view of where the technology needs to go from here, in order to develop stakeholder confidence that injected CO2 can be monitored and verified and any leakage quickly detected

Technical Report

Natural Analogues for the Geological Storage of CO2

  • 1 March 2005
  • Storage

This is the final report of the Natural Analogues for the Storage of CO2 in the Geological Environment (NASCENT) project. The Nascent project has studied natural accumulations of carbon dioxide (CO2 – an important greenhouse gas, thought to be responsible for climate change) as analogues of the geological storage of anthropogenic CO2 emissions.Before large-scale underground CO2 storage can take place, it will be necessary to demonstrate that the processes are well understood, risks to the environment and human populations are low, and environmental disturbances can be minimised. One way of demonstrating that CO2 can remain trapped underground for geologically significant timescales is to provide evidence from existing naturally occurring accumulations. These accumulations occur in a variety of geological environments and many can be demonstrated to have retained CO2 for periods longer than those being considered for CO2 storage.

Technical Report

Launch Meeting of the Risk Assessment Network

  • 23 August 2005
  • Event Proceedings
  • Storage

This report summarises the major outcomes of the launch meeting of the Risk Assessment Network which was jointly organised by IEA GHG and TNO with the support of EPRI. It was held at the TNO offices in Utrecht, Netherlands, 23-24 August 2005. This international meeting was attended by 40 delegates from industry and research institutes drawn from nine countries.

Technical Report

A Review of Natural CO2 Occurrences and Releases and their Relevance to CO2 Storage

  • 1 September 2005
  • Storage

The aim of this study was to evaluate natural occurrences of CO2 leakage and compare and contrast them with engineered storage of CO2 in geological formations. The objective of the study was to provide a reference manual for IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme members and others interested in the subject, to provide a factual and balanced review of natural CO2 releases and their relevance to geological CO2 storage.

Technical Report

CO2 Storage by Mineral Carbonation

  • 1 September 2005
  • Storage
  • Utilisation

In 2000 the IEA GHG R&D programme issued a comprehensive report on technologies for capture of CO2 using mineral carbonation. This report evaluated 6 candidate processes but concluded that only one process involving a hot melt of magnesium chloride showed any promise. Mineral carbonation is attractive as a CO2 storage option because of its permanency but would involve mining, processing and re-depositing of massive quantities of material. In the mean time research has continued and it was felt that it was timely to conduct a more up to date study. As a first step a short review of recent developments and literature was commissioned to ascertain whether it was worthwhile going ahead with a full scale study.

Technical Report

Well Bore Integrity Workshop Houston, TX, USA, 4-5 April 2005

  • 1 September 2005
  • Event Proceedings
  • Storage

The integrity of well bores, their long-term ability to retain CO2, has been identified as a significant potential risk for the long-term security of geological storage facilities. A workshop was held in April 2005 to bring together over 50 experts from both industrial operators and from research organisations. Industrial operations are part of CO2 enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects or acid gas waste disposal projects. Current research includes laboratory investigations that attempt to simulate long-term geochemical and mechanical processes that may affect well completion materials – mainly cement; field studies of well completions that have been exposed to CO2 during industrial projects as described above, and modelling studies, both of local reactions and upscaled simulations of leakage across basins.

Technical Report

Permitting Issues for CO2 Capture and Geological Storage

  • 1 December 2005
  • Capture
  • Storage

The capture and storage of CO2 in geological formations is a promising technology for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Such projects will involve very large investments in plant, pipelines, wells and reservoir development. As with most large undertakings it will be essential to obtain permits for a whole range of activities which have to be carried out in order to implement such projects. Obtaining permits has been a major constraint on the rapid deployment of many new technologies and can cause considerable delay and effort even when implementing proven systems. To ensure that CO2 capture and storage can be deployed successfully in the required timescales any issues that may arise during permitting of CO2 capture and storage projects need to be identified as early as possible and permitting procedures developed and agreed. This study was commissioned to provide an overview of permitting issues in CCS projects and provide some guidance to operators and regulators who are concerned with the technology.

Technical Report

Low greenhouse gas emission transport fuels: the impact of CO2 capture and storage on selected pathways

  • 1 December 2005
  • Capture
  • Storage

In assessing the environmental impact of transport technology options, it is necessary to consider the impact of each of the stages of fuel extraction, refining, distribution and use in the vehicle. This needs to be done in a systematic way for the ‘novel’ systems considered, as well as for reference cases. The approach requires a form of life-cycle analysis which, in the transport, field has come to be known as Well-to-Wheels analysis (WTW). A subset of this analysis covers the production of the fuel up to the point where it is dispensed into the vehicle’s fuel tank – this is known as Well-to-Tank analysis; the second part of the chain is Tank-to-Wheels analysis (WTT and TTW respectively). In the main report the component WTT and TTW data are discussed in depth but in this overview the emphasis is on the overall WTW results.The study is set in the Netherlands; representative of a European location. The vehicle fleet for each type of fuel is assumed to be large enough that economies of scale can be expected in distribution and in vehicle costs. Some consideration is also given to how the results would be affected if set in a North American location.

Technical Report

Safe Storage of CO2

  • 1 January 2006
  • Storage

The aim of this study is to review the regulatory processes and operational practises within the natural gas storage industry and assess their applicability to CO2 storage. The objective of the study will be to develop a report that can act as a reference manual for IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEA GHG) members in their discussions with policy makers and environmental pressure groups to demonstrate that geological can be a safe and environmentally friendly mitigation option.

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