This website will offer limited functionality in this browser. We only support the recent versions of major browsers like Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge.

Technology Collaboration Programme by IEA

The Landscape of Carbon Dioxide Capture, Storage and Management (CCSM) Education in the UK

Dr João Carlos Diniz da Costa

Citation: IEAGHG, "The Landscape of Carbon Dioxide Capture, Storage and Management (CCSM) Education in the UK", 2009-TR5, August 2009.

Download The Full Publication Now

Publication Overview

This report was commissioned by the IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEA GHG) to assist the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) task force in the assessment of international graduate degrees at MSc and PhD level on Carbon Dioxide Capture, Storage, and Carbon Management (hereinafter CCSM) from universities. The scope of this report is to identify academic perspectives and programs in the areas of CCSM currently available in the United Kingdom (UK). The information assembled in this report was sought from the internet, email contacts and visiting key universities. This report addresses the major findings and discusses the current landscape of CCSM education in the UKThis report has concentrated on courses provided in the UK. In addition, mention should be made that from a base in the UK the IEA GHG organises an annual International CCS Summer School. This is hosted at different locations worldwide each time; Germany, Canada and Australia in the first three years. This course offers an intensive week in all aspects of CCS, from capture to storage, and non-technical topics such as economics, policy, regulation, safety and public communication.   

Publication Summary

The number of postgraduate degrees and short courses in CCSM in the UK is limited, and mainly focusing on carbon management. The University of Edinburgh offers a Masters of Carbon Capture and Storage led by the School of GeoSciences, in which carbon storage is a major component. The UNBL consortium offers an Engineering Doctorate (Industrial) in carbon dioxide capture aiming at graduating 50 Engineering Doctorates in the next 7 years. Another interesting alliance is the European consortium of the Universities of Edinburgh (UK), Versailles St-Quentin (France) and Bergen (Norway) which offers PERICLES (Postdoctoral European Masters Formation on Interactions between Climate, Environment and Society). The CCS postgraduate degrees surveyed have interdisciplinary contents including subjects in the areas of economics, social, political and environment. These subjects are also core in the carbon management degrees. Nevertheless, it is observed that “Regulations and Law” and “Risk Analysis” were not covered in the surveyed programs.

It is recommended that these areas are considered for future Masters Curricula in CCSM.

The majority of the postgraduate programs surveyed include the conventional course delivery per semester and requiring a dissertation, which can be replaced by an industrial project or industrial research. This delivery mode may suit full time students. More flexible modes include intensive two week courses, attending seminars and summer schools, which are tailored to part time students. CCSM postgraduate degrees offered as a Masters or Doctorate levels have exit options for awards as postgraduate certificate or diploma.

There has been a good mobilisation from the private sector and universities in offering short courses in CCSM. In terms of carbon storage, the Scottish Centre for Carbon Capture has two short courses dealing with CO2 injection and storage, and in particular focusing on the education of engineers on carbon storage. No short courses were found in carbon dioxide capture, and the majority of the other short courses available are mainly on carbon footprint, and potentially addressing new guidelines and standards (PA2050 and ISO 14067).

In addition, mention should be made that from a base in the UK the IEA GHG organises an annual International CCS Summer School. This is hosted at different locations worldwide each time; Germany, Canada and Australia in the first three years. This course offers an intensive week in all aspects of CCS, from capture to storage, and non-technical topics such as economics, policy, regulation, safety and public communication..

Download Publication

Access the complete publication in PDF format.

Download Now

Related Publications

View similar publications.

View All Publications
Technical Report

The Role of Indices in Assessing the Maturity of CCUS Technologies and their Readiness for Deployment

  • 1 February 2024
  • Industry Insights

This study was undertaken on behalf of IEAGHG by Foresight Transitions Ltd. While a technology may be technically mature, it has become increasingly clear that the technology may not necessarily be considered commercially ‘bankable’ by investors. In this study, the potential for an index or indices to provide that confidence was explored. The findings from the study will be of interest to the broader energy community but, in particular, should benefit technology developers, CCUS end users, investors and policymakers.

Methologies and Technologies for Mitigation

  • 1 December 2023
  • Industry Insights

The driver behind this study is to develop a report built on the on the previous IEAGHG report on methods of leakage mitigation (2007/11). The proposed study should focus on current mitigation and remediation methods that may be applied or considered in site specific conditions in the event of unpredicted CO2 migration. Each geological storage site will have an adaptive site specific monitoring plan, based on a risk assessment. Detection of a significant irregularity may involve supplementing the monitoring program, in order to detect a possible leak and if necessary engaging mitigation measures.

Technical Review

A bibliometric analysis of GHGT abstract submissions

  • 14 June 2023
  • Industry Insights

This technical review provides an insight into how the focus of research in the field of Carbon Capture, Utilisation and Storage (CCUS) has evolved across a decade, from 2012–2022. It is designed to help understand where the most research has been conducted, and to see where CCUS research is going.

Quantifying the Socio-Economic Value of CCS: A Review

  • 3 August 2022
  • Costs of CCUS
  • Public Perception

As policymakers consider options at their disposal to achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement, understanding the socio-economic impacts on local communities and industrial regions is crucial. Integrated assessment models (IAMs) often lack the economic, social and geographic detail to fully reveal the role that CCS and CDR technologies, such as BECCS, can play in national economies – noting that deployment of both CCS and BECCS has long continued to lag expectations. Providing a multi-regional, technology agnostic and transparent quantification of the social value of these technologies may be essential to unlocking this impasse.

Technical Report

Review of Constructability and Operational Challenges faced by CCUS projects

  • 9 September 2020
  • Industry Insights

IEAGHG has commissioned several technical studies linked to large CCS projects1. Although constructability and operational challenges have been identified in previous IEAGHG reports, some aspects were unique due to the locations where the large CCS projects were implemented. These included the status of the initial facilities and other techno-economic and financial aspects of the specific CCUS projects. IEAGHG identified the need to provide a guide on constructability and operation for new CCS users. The objective of this study is to collect information from CCS projects to support the decisions during the transition from the planning to the execution phase. This study analysed a complete list of large CCUS projects from which relevant experience could be extracted. The projects were divided into three categories: operating projects; under construction or at advanced development; and cancelled projects. Based on the analysed projects, this study has delivered an assessment of potential key areas for success, and a decision tool guide for future projects

Technical Report

CCS in Energy and Climate Scenarios

  • 1 July 2019
  • Industry Insights

The purpose of IAMs is to quantify the interactions and trade-offs between societal demands for energy, economic and environmental services, using a systems approach. These systems are typically the energy system, the economy, the earth-land system, the water system and atmospheric climate system, although every IAM does not necessarily include all these systems and have varying

Technical Report

Sustainability in Petrochemicals

  • 1 February 2019
  • Capture
  • Industry Insights

This report investigates a unique combination of these industry drivers on the historic, current and future status of the petrochemical industry to gain insight into the sustainability of petrochemicals. Three categories of petrochemicals are subject to analysis, namely methanol, olefins and ammonia/urea. For each of these petrochemicals, the following series of studies are formed and analysed in aggregate to gain insight in to the sustainability prospects of the industry:<!– wp:acf/columns {"name":"acf/columns","data":{"padding_top":"1","_padding_top":"field_columns_fields_padding_top","padding_bottom":"1","_padding_bottom":"field_columns_fields_padding_bottom","margin_top":"0","_margin_top":"field_columns_fields_margin_top","margin_bottom":"0","_margin_bottom":"field_columns_fields_margin_bottom"},"mode":"preview"} –> <!– wp:acf/column-content {"name":"acf/column-content","mode":"preview"} –> <!– wp:list –><ul><!– wp:list-item –><!– wp:list-item –><li>An assessment of the historic and current status of market trade, including trends in end-uses, feedstocks, demand, production and international trade. Demand projections for each chemical are made based on collected data.</li><!– /wp:list-item –><!– /wp:list-item –> <!– wp:list-item –><!– wp:list-item –><li>Process engineering characterisation of the current and low carbon alternative routes and feedstocks to produce the key petrochemical productions.</li><!– /wp:list-item –><!– /wp:list-item –> <!– wp:list-item –><!– wp:list-item –><li>Environmental life cycle assessment of the various feedstocks and production methods for each petrochemical and a contribution analysis of the key environmental impacts.</li><!– /wp:list-item –><!– /wp:list-item –> <!– wp:list-item –><!– wp:list-item –><li>Market projection of petrochemical production and technology mixes for a key region China, for the time period 2010 – 2050.</li><!– /wp:list-item –><!– /wp:list-item –> <!– wp:list-item –><!– wp:list-item –><li>A series of expert stakeholder interviews on views of how the petrochemical industry may progress in terms of demand, costs, environmental impacts and policy drivers.</li><!– /wp:list-item –><!– /wp:list-item –></ul><!– /wp:list –> <!– /wp:acf/column-content –> <!– /wp:acf/columns –>

Technical Report

The CCS Project at Air Products’ Port Arthur Hydrogen Production Facility

  • 1 December 2018
  • Industry Insights

In April 2013, the first commercial-scale, steam methane reformer hydrogen production facility incorporating vacuum-swing adsorption carbon capture gas separation technology began full-scale operation at Air Products’ facilities located on the site of the Valero Port Arthur Refinery in Texas, USA. This report summarizes the experience of Air Products and its partners that will provide valuable insights to other petroleum refining and petrochemical industrial facilities that wish to reduce their lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions through CCUS.

Technical Report

Enabling CCS Clusters

  • 1 February 2018
  • Industry Insights

It is widely considered that deployment of carbon capture and storage (CCS) for clusters of energy intensive industries (EIIs) will become vital for meeting long-term greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction targets, and is a cost effective way for doing so, according to organisations such as the International Energy Agency (IEA) and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). In addition, it will be important to develop the related finance mechanism quickly to prevent carbon leakage, i.e. businesses transferring operations to places with less stringent GHG emission standards. Recent evidence highlights there might be different needs and challenges in deployment of industrial clusters, compared to those involving power generation. IEAGHG’s Technical Report 2015/03 “Carbon capture and storage cluster projects: review and future opportunities” reviews 12 CCS cluster projects and finds that the most successful clusters are currently based on CO2-EOR in North America. This is to be expected as EOR provides a commercial benefit to investors in such activities.Further requirements for ICCS clusters include: generating confidence for per-investment in CCS infrastructure, new methods to attract international investment and systematic development of CCS cluster business plans. However, more information is necessary regarding the transferability of conclusions for CCS clusters based on power generation incentives, such as a UK Contract for Difference (CfD), to those involving multiple industry sectors, and especially EIIs.This study examines the economic and commercial arrangements needed to enable the global deployment of industrial CCS clusters. Over a period of eight months, with significant input from stakeholders from industry, government and the investment community, the project has identified the key enablers to unlock private investment in ICCS and developed four business models, which are expected to work in various regions around the world including North America, Europe, Australia and China.

Technical Review

Gas Supply Chain Emissions

  • 1 October 2017
  • Industry Insights

This technical review has been undertaken with the aim of providing a summary of the current status of research into greenhouse gas emissions in the natural gas supply chain. Although 90% or more of the CO<sub>2</sub> produced at gas fired power plants can be captured, emissions from the supply chain may reduce the near-zero-emission image of gas as an energy source. Emissions are predominantly from two sources: <ol> <!– wp:list-item –><!– wp:list-item –><li>Methane emissions during production and also fugitive emissions during transport.</li><!– /wp:list-item –><!– /wp:list-item –> <!– wp:list-item –><!– wp:list-item –><li>CO<sub>2</sub> emissions from gas production installations, gas purification plants, pipeline compressors, LNG liquefaction plants, ships and receiving terminals.</li><!– /wp:list-item –><!– /wp:list-item –> </ol>

Our most recent publications

Our authoritative, peer-reviewed publications cover topics that include carbon capture, transport, storage, monitoring, regulation, and more.

View All Publications
Technical Review

7th Post-Combustion Capture Conference Summary

  • 1 April 2024
  • Capture
  • Event Proceedings

The 7th edition of the Post Combustion Capture Conference (PCCC-7) was held on the 25?28 September 2023 and was jointly hosted by the IEAGHG, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and sponsored by Worley, Shell, and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. (MHI).

Technical Report

Techno-Economic Assessment of Small-Scale Carbon Capture for Industrial and Power Systems

  • 1 March 2024
  • Capture
  • Costs of CCUS

This study, undertaken on behalf of IEAGHG by Element Energy (now a part of ERM), explores the role of CCS in decarbonising small-scale industry and power generation applications. While relatively under investigated compared to their larger scale counterparts, reaching net zero will be dependent on successfully addressing the emissions from small-scale facilities. The findings from the study will be of interest to the broader energy community but, in particular, should benefit project developers, the finance community and policymakers.

Technical Report

Clean steel an environmental and technoeconomic outlook of a disruptive technology

  • 1 March 2024
  • Capture
  • Costs of CCUS

This study primarily presents a comparative analysis of steelmaking pathways to cost-effectively decarbonise a steel mill, taking a life-cycle perspective on associated environmental impacts. The roll-out of clean steel technologies is envisioned to have a significant implication for support infrastructure. Therefore, a secondary objective of the study is to gain insights into the primary energy and infrastructure implications associated with large-scale deployment of different steel decarbonisation pathways. Clean steel production will likely be more expensive than steel produced today; this poses additional economic strains on steel producers and consumers. Consequently, a third objective is to estimate the price premium that clean steel could command in existing and future markets. Further, this study formulates recommendations for key stakeholders to support the sector and outlines recommendations for further work.

Technical Report

The Role of Indices in Assessing the Maturity of CCUS Technologies and their Readiness for Deployment

  • 1 February 2024
  • Industry Insights

This study was undertaken on behalf of IEAGHG by Foresight Transitions Ltd. While a technology may be technically mature, it has become increasingly clear that the technology may not necessarily be considered commercially ‘bankable’ by investors. In this study, the potential for an index or indices to provide that confidence was explored. The findings from the study will be of interest to the broader energy community but, in particular, should benefit technology developers, CCUS end users, investors and policymakers.

Technical Review

6th International Workshop on Offshore Geologic CO2 Storage

  • 1 December 2023
  • Event Proceedings
  • Storage

The 6th International Workshop on Offshore Geologic CO2 Storage was held in Aberdeen on 13-14 September. Organised with the University of Texas and hosted by the University of Aberdeen. The loca on was very appropriate as we were co-hosted and sponsored by Storegga who leads the Acorn project nearby in Scotland. This project had been recently announced by the UK government as a Track 2 Cluster project. This 6th workshop had 190 delegates (60 in-person and 130 virtual) from 35 countries, with a good mix of industry, researchers and regulators.

Methologies and Technologies for Mitigation

  • 1 December 2023
  • Industry Insights

The driver behind this study is to develop a report built on the on the previous IEAGHG report on methods of leakage mitigation (2007/11). The proposed study should focus on current mitigation and remediation methods that may be applied or considered in site specific conditions in the event of unpredicted CO2 migration. Each geological storage site will have an adaptive site specific monitoring plan, based on a risk assessment. Detection of a significant irregularity may involve supplementing the monitoring program, in order to detect a possible leak and if necessary engaging mitigation measures.

Technical Report

International Standards and Testing for Novel Carbonaceous Building Materials

  • 1 December 2023
  • Policy & Regulation
  • Utilisation

Over 4 billion tonnes of cement are produced each year, equating to approximately 8% of global anthropogenic CO2 emissions, and this industry will continue to grow with the expansion of the built environment at a time that emissions need to be reduced. The utilisation or reduction of CO2 within cement, concrete and building materials could be a valuable way to contribute to emissions reductions in the sector , but there are several barriers, including the current state of standards, regulations and policies. This study will provide useful information for the technical and research community, the CCUS industry, the construction industry, and policymakers, providing an unbiased and non-prescriptive evaluation of international standards and testing relevant to novel carbonaceous building materials to address some of those barriers. The market potential for CO2 utilisation processes in the construction industry is also investigated, and the methods for certifying and measuring embodied carbon content of carbonated building materials is evaluated and the challenges therein.

Technical Review

Monitoring Network Meeting Report

  • 1 December 2023
  • Event Proceedings
  • Storage

The IEAGHG Monitoring Network aims to assess new technologies and techniques in the monitoring of CO2 storage, determine the limitations, accuracy and applicability of monitoring techniques, disseminate information from research and pilot storage projects around the world, develop extensive monitoring guidelines for the different sub-categories of geological storage; oil and gas fields, unmineable coal seams, and saline aquifers covering the differing conditions and reservoir properties encountered globally as well as to engage with relevant regulatory bodies.

Technical Report

Components of CCS Infrastructure – Interim CO2 Holding Options

  • 27 November 2023
  • Storage
  • Transport

This work, undertaken on behalf of IEAGHG by TNO and SINTEF, provides an overview of temporary / interim CO2 storage, or ‘holding’, options (also called buffers) and investigates the role of buffer storage and its potential to create flexible and robust carbon capture and storage (CCS) chains. The report looks at current and emerging buffer technologies, conducts simulations to demonstrate the temporary storage required for given flow-rate scenarios and discusses the impact of buffer capacity on transport costs. In the report, the storage requested in the chain for normal operation is presented as " temporary storage" and storage to give buffer capacity is presented as " buffer storage". This report has focussed on buffering at the emitter site. The results of this study will benefit CO2 storage site project developers, operators, financiers and regulators.

Technical Report

Classification of Total Storage Resources and Storage Coefficients

  • 1 November 2023
  • Storage

The CO2 Storage Resources Management System (SRMS) is a classification scheme to quantify, classify and categorise CO2 storage resources. It comprises ‘total storage resources’, which are understood as maximum (theoretical) storage quantities that could ever be accommodated in the subsurface. Comprising maximum mobile CO2 in structural/stratigraphic traps, maximum residually trapped CO2 in other parts of the formation, and maximum dissolution potential in remaining formation water. ‘Storable quantities’ are understood as accessible from one or several current or future projects. It is the sum of capacity, contingent and prospective resources. The concept of ‘storage coefficient’ ‘E’ is the ratio of the subsurface volume of CO2 storable quantities to either the total storage resources or the pore volume. The calculation is arguably complicated as E is impacted by lithological heterogeneity, trapping structures, boundary conditions, injection rates, well spacing, fluid properties etc. Due to its complexity, there is much controversy on how to estimate E, with some arguing it should not be used at all and that reservoir simulation is a better path. However, estimates for E are used in most regional mapping studies. This study explores storage resource classification schemes and their evolution in understanding, the calculation of storage resources and the storage co-efficient. This is explored in terms of calculating E for CO2 storage sites, through flow modelling and analytical solutions.

Get the latest CCS news and insights

Get essential news and updates from the CCS sector and the IEAGHG by email.

"*" indicates required fields

Can’t find what you are looking for?

Whatever you would like to know, our dedicated team of experts is here to help you. Just drop us an email and we will get back to you as soon as we can.

Contact Us Now