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Technology Collaboration Programme by IEA

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Discover the latest advances carbon capture and storage research

Technical Report

Iron and Steel CCS Study (Techno-Economics Integrated Steel Mill)

  • 1 July 2013
  • Capture
  • Costs of CCUS

The primary goal of this project is to establish a methodology to evaluate the cost of steel production when deploying CO2 capture technology in an integrated steel mill. The objectives of this study were: To specify a “REFERENCE” steel mill typical to Western European configuration; and assess the techno-economic performance of the integrated steel mill without and with CO2 capture. To evaluate the techno-economic performance, the breakdown of the CO2 emissions; and estimating the CO2 avoidance cost of the following cases: o Case 1: An integrated steel mill typical to Western Europe as the base case. o Case 2: Post-Combustion CO2 capture using conventional MEA at two different levels of CO2 capture rate (End of Pipe Cases or EOP) o Case 3: An Oxygen Blown Blast Furnace (OBF) with top gas recycle and the use of MDEA/Pz as solvent for CO2 capture

Technical Report

Techno Economic of PCC Process Flow Sheet Mods

  • 1 August 2014
  • Capture
  • Costs of CCUS

This study evaluated different post combustion capture process modifications for SCPC and NGCC power plant. The study also evaluated the current state of process design improvements such as absorber intercooling, operation at higher stripper pressure and an advanced level of waste heat integration for the SCPC case. In order to identify the effect of future improvements in the solvent; a generic improved amine based solvent ‘Solvent 2020 was considered. Regarding to the different process modifications, matrix stripping was found to be having the highest efficiency penalty due to the increased energy requirement by compressors. Also the cost of electricity and cost of CO<sub>2</sub> avoided for this modification was found to be higher compared to other process modifications.

Technical Review

2014-TR4 Emerging Capture Technologies

  • 1 December 2014
  • Capture
  • Costs of CCUS

This Technical Review gives an interim overview of research and development aimed at improving and reducing the cost of commercial scale carbon dioxide capture in the power and process industries. It considers technologies principally applicable in post-combustion capture, pre-combustion capture, oxy-combustion capture and finally systems with circulating solids; in that order, which is more or less in line with the current maturity of each approach. It then goes on to consider applications in iron and steel and cement production and oil refining. IEAGHG’s normal practice is for its reports to be sent to external reviewers and for the reviewers’ comments to be taken into account prior to publication. This Technical Review is an interim report which has not yet gone through this process. An IEAGHG Report which has been subject to external review will be published in due course.  

Technical Report

4th CCS Cost Network Meeting

  • 1 August 2016
  • Costs of CCUS
  • Event Proceedings

The purpose of the workshop is to share and discuss the most currently available information on the cost of carbon capture and storage (CCS) in electric utility and other industrial applications, as well as the current outlook for future CCS costs and deployment. The workshop also seeks to identify key issues or topics related to CCS costs that merit further discussion and study.

Technical Report

Techno-Economic Evaluation of Retrofitting ccs in a market pulp mill and an integrated pulp and board mill

  • 1 December 2016
  • Capture
  • Costs of CCUS

This study assessed two hypothetical reference mills situated in the west coast of Finland as a basis for evaluation. The pulp mill (Base Case 1A) has an annual production of 800,000 adt of bleached softwood Kraft pulp (BSKP) which is sold as market pulp. The integrated pulp and board mill (Base Case 1B) has an annual production of 400,000 adt of board. This mill also consumes 60,000 adt/y of the softwood Kraft pulp that it produces, thus only 740,000 adt/y of BSKP is sold to the market. This study aims to evaluate the performance and cost of retrofitting post-combustion CO2 capture technology to the pulp mill and understand its implication on the mill’s operation in terms of fuel balance, utility requirements (i.e. steam and electricity balance) and the mill’s financial performance.

Technical Report

Techno - Economic Evaluation of SMR Based Standalone (Merchant) Hydrogen Plant with CCS

  • 1 February 2017
  • Capture
  • Costs of CCUS

This study aimed to provide baseline information presenting the performance and costs of incorporating the CO<sub>2</sub> capture technologies to a SMR based hydrogen plant operating as merchant plant (as a standalone plant). The basis of the design of the hydrogen production process are presented in the main report. These are briefly described in this overview. The selection of technology options for CO<sub>2</sub> capture is based on the available information and performance data that could be provided by equipment manufacturers and suppliers.

Technical Report

Techno-Economic Evaluation of HYCO Plant Integrated to Ammonia / Urea or Methanol Production with CCS

  • 1 February 2017
  • Capture
  • Costs of CCUS

The ammonia and methanol industry is an allied industry very related to the production of hydrogen or HyCO gas. Globally, around 60% of the produced hydrogen is consumed by these industries. Outside China, production of these chemicals from natural gas is predominant. In fact, the production of ammonia and methanol is always an important strategy on how natural gas assets are monetised. An important aspects of this study is to demonstrate how an SMR based hydrogen/HyCO production is integrated to an industrial complex. Furthermore, it is essential to understand the different aspects of the production process and how will it be affected when additional CO<sub>2</sub> is captured from the SMR’s flue gas. IEAGHG has commissioned this study to evaluate the performance and cost of deploying CO<sub>2</sub> capture and storage in mega-plants producing urea and methanol from natural gas as feedstock. The results presented in this study should form the basis of future studies in industrial CCS and CCU.

Technical Review

Evaluating the Costs of Retrofitting CO2

  • 1 April 2017
  • Capture
  • Costs of CCUS

The purpose of this report is to present a reference document that describes the technical basis and key assumptions to be used in evaluating the performance of the integrated oil refinery without and with CO<sub>2</sub> capture. The engineering and design basis, and various assumptions on feedstock, additives, products and by-products, and the specification of the CO<sub>2</sub> that are outlined in this report will be used as a reference for developing the refinery configurations to be developed in the study which will be published once the project is completed. Where applicable, information retrieved from IEAGHG document “Criteria for Technical and Economic Assessment of Plants with Low CO<sub>2</sub> Emissions” Version C-6, March 2014, are included.

Technical Review

ReCAP Project Understanding Cost of Retrofitting

  • 1 August 2017
  • Costs of CCUS
  • Industry Insights

The main purpose of the study was to evaluate the cost of retrofitting CO2 capture in a range of refinery types typical of those found in Europe. These included bo0th simple and high complexity refineries covering typical European refinery capacities from 100,000 to 350,000 bbl/d.  The assessments performed in this report focused on retrofit costs including modifications in the refineries, interconnections, and additional CHP and utility facilities. The main focus of the study was on CO2 capture from refinery Base Case 4, which was considered to be the most relevant reference for existing European refineries of interest for CO2 capture retrofit. Considering the large number of cases (16) and their complexity, a hybrid methodology is used to evaluate the cost of the sections (CO2 capture and compression, utilities, and interconnecting) of the concept. In this approach, four of the 16 capture cases were selected to represent a wide range of CO2 capture capacity and flue gas CO2 content. In each case, detailed assessments were undertaken. These detailed cost assessments form, based on subsequent scaling, the basis for the assessment of the other cases. The scaling equations have a larger purpose in that they can be used by refineries/policy experts to evaluate capital costs of retrofitting CO2 capture to refineries of interest.

Technical Report

5th Cost Network Proceedings

  • 1 March 2018
  • Costs of CCUS
  • Event Proceedings

The purpose of the CCS Cost Workshops is to share and discuss the most currently available information on the cost of carbon capture and storage (CCS) in electric utility and industrial process applications, as well as the outlook for future CCS costs and deployment. The workshop also seeks to identify other key issues or topics related to CCS costs that merit further discussion and study.

Technical Report

Effects of Plant Location on the Costs of CO2 Capture

  • 1 April 2018
  • Capture
  • Costs of CCUS

In recent years, IEAGHG has published several studies that address the application of CCS to coal and natural gas-fired power plants. The studies are based on a hypothetical site in the Netherlands. However, while Europe may be one region where large-scale power plants with CCS are built, there is even greater potential for CCS in regions where coal consumption is high and increasing or where emission reduction targets would require CCS to also be considered for gas-fired power stations. While very often, the cost of CO2 capture is cited as a single value or as a range, the performance and costs of plants with CO2 capture will be different at different locations – and there is currently a shortage of information calculated on a consistent basis, particularly for emerging economies.The key factors that influence the costs of capture, how these vary regionally and how the costs of capture varies regionally would be of enormous interest. For many, greater granularity in the regional differences in costs would be of value. For countries, such information could help them develop their national and international energy policy to greater effect, particularly where it relates to CCS. Similarly, industry could better identify markets and better target its spend on technology development and deployment. Incomplete information can lead to flawed analysis and result in poorer decision making. Considering these matters, the IEAGHG ExCo felt a study to investigate how the cost of CO2 capture varied for different locations was warranted. Following a competitive tender, Amec Foster Wheeler (now Wood Group), Milan, were commissioned to undertake the study.

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