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Technology Collaboration Programme by IEA

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Discover the latest advances carbon capture and storage research

Technical Review

Toward a Commons Method of Cost Estimation for CO2 Capture and Storage at Fossil Fuel Power Plants

  • 1 March 2013
  • Costs of CCUS
  • Industry Insights

To address the current state of CCS costs, a workshop was convened in March 2011 at which an international group of experts from industrial firms, government agencies, universities, and environmen tal organizations met to share information and perspectives on CCS costs for electric power plants [2]. A major conclusion of that work shop was that there are significant differences and inconsistencies in the way CCS costs are currently calculated and reported by various authors and organizations. As a consequence, there is a significant degree of confusion, misunderstanding, and mis-representation of CCS costs in the information now available publicly. These incon sistencies hamper the ability to correctly and systematically com pare the cost of different carbon capture options. They also distort comparisons between CCS and other greenhouse gas reduction measures—with potential consequences for both technology and policy developments.

Technical Review

Current State of the Art Technology for Iron & Steel Production

  • 1 April 2013
  • Capture
  • Industry Insights

This document is drafted by IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme in support of the activities of the EU Zero Emissions Platforms (ZEP) assessment of potential CCS deployment in the energy intensive industries. It aims to provide an overview of the current state of the art in steel production worldwide and present a brief overview of the development of different technology options for CO2 capture in the steel industry. Steel is the largest globally traded metal. In 2011, around 1.49 billion tonnes of crude steel were produced worldwide; of which ~45% was from China. Other leading steel producing regions or countries include the EU27 (12%), NAFTA1 (8%), CIS2 (8%), Japan (7%), and India (5%). Figure 1 presents the historical data showing the crude steel production worldwide. In the last decade, steel production has achieved an average annual growth rate of around 5-6% [1

Technical Review

Review of Status of Global Non CO2 GHG Emissions

  • 1 April 2013
  • Industry Insights

The aim of this study therefore is to update the summary of the work completed by IEAGHG previously (See Section 3). The specific objectives of the study are: <!-- wp:acf/columns {"name":"acf/columns","data":{"padding_top":"1","_padding_top":"field_columns_fields_padding_top","padding_bottom":"1","_padding_bottom":"field_columns_fields_padding_bottom","margin_top":"0","_margin_top":"field_columns_fields_margin_top","margin_bottom":"0","_margin_bottom":"field_columns_fields_margin_bottom"},"mode":"preview"} --> <!-- wp:acf/column-content {"name":"acf/column-content","mode":"preview"} --> <!-- wp:list --><ul> <!-- wp:list-item --><!-- wp:list-item --><li>To review the current sources of Non-CO<sub>2</sub> GHG’s and update their emissions data.</li><!-- /wp:list-item --><!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --><!-- wp:list-item --><li>To look at the trends in Non-CO<sub>2</sub> GHG emissions over the years from our study to present date and assess which mitigation options have been successfully deployed.</li><!-- /wp:list-item --><!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --><!-- wp:list-item --><li>To attempt to assess why some measures have not been introduced.</li><!-- /wp:list-item --><!-- /wp:list-item --> </ul><!-- /wp:list --> <!-- /wp:acf/column-content --> <!-- /wp:acf/columns --> The study will also aim to look at the organisations active in these areas, such as the Methane to Markets Programme in the USA, a body similar to the CSLF. This would enable us to consider if there are any opportunities for further work by IEAGHG on such topics that could assist deployment or address barriers to deployment. The review would therefore also assist in IEAGHG’s future strategic planning activities.  

Technical Report

UK FEED Studies – A Summary

  • 1 October 2013
  • Industry Insights

A key aim of the FEED was thus to assist in selection of a winning project but the participants were also required to narrow the range of projected costs and clearly identify the cost risks and establish upper and lower limits. DECC also had the intention of making results public to enhance learning and information exchange. Initially 9 consortia entered projects into the competition but only two proceeded into the FEED phase. One of these withdrew before the full FEED was developed so some elements of this FEED are less well developed.

Technical Report

Information Sheets for CCS

  • 1 November 2013
  • Industry Insights

This report was originally intended to be 14 standalone information sheets on the many aspects of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS). The information sheets have been combined in one document to produce this report but it is recommended that the standalone original sheets are used primarily. These are available to download as separate files on the IEAGHG website

Technical Report

Iron & Steel Workshop Tokyo

  • 1 August 2014
  • Event Proceedings
  • Industry Insights

This report summarises the presentations and outcomes from the “Iron and Steel Industry CCUS and Process Integration Workshop”. The workshop took place from 5<sup>th</sup> to 7<sup>th</sup> November 2013 at Tokyo Institute of Technology in Japan. IETS (Industrial Energy-related Technologies and Systems), World Steel Association (WSA) and IEAGHG jointly organised this meeting, which was hosted by Prof Tatsuro Ariyama. Key objectives of the workshop were to review the progress in CO<sub>2</sub> reduction technologies in iron- and steelmaking since the last workshop in 2011 and to provide a discussion forum with focus on the Asian iron and steel industries. The 50 attendees were able to participate in a full three-day programme and the IETS members had the opportunity to visit JFE East Japan Works at Keihin subsequently. The first two days of the workshop ran under IEAGHG and focussed on CO<sub>2</sub> reduction strategies in the iron and steel industries, whereas the third day was under the theme of IETS and concentrated on process development and efficiency improvements. The following report provides summaries of some, but not all, of the presentations given at the workshop.

Technical Report

CO2 impurities

  • 1 April 2016
  • Industry Insights

The main objectives of the report are to: Review the CO2 impurities that could be present from different CO2 capture technologies and develop twelve CO2 impurity scenario compositions for further analysis; Evaluate these impurity scenarios for CO2 physical and transport properties. The properties that are investigated are the dew point, bubble point, melting point, density, Joule-Thomson coefficients, speed of sound, viscosity and thermal conductivity. Evaluate the effects of the impurities on CO2 compression and liquefaction in terms of performance and energy requirements; Identify the effects of the impurities on the operating conditions for both pipeline and ship based transportation; Evaluate the effect of the impurities on the selection of materials for pipeline and ship transportation.

Technical Review

Reference data and Supporting Literature Reviews for SMR Based Hydrogen Production with CCS

  • 1 March 2017
  • Capture
  • Industry Insights

Over the past years a number of demonstration CCS projects have been developed around the world with the aim to provide valuable information, assist in the design of large CO<sub>2 </sub>capture plants and to advance the understanding of CO<sub>2 </sub>behaviour in the subsurface. The objectives of the CCS demonstration projects can be summarized as follows: <!-- wp:acf/columns {"name":"acf/columns","data":{"padding_top":"1","_padding_top":"field_columns_fields_padding_top","padding_bottom":"1","_padding_bottom":"field_columns_fields_padding_bottom","margin_top":"0","_margin_top":"field_columns_fields_margin_top","margin_bottom":"0","_margin_bottom":"field_columns_fields_margin_bottom"},"mode":"preview"} --> <!-- wp:acf/column-content {"name":"acf/column-content","mode":"preview"} --> <!-- wp:list --><ul> <!-- wp:list-item --><!-- wp:list-item --><li>Demonstrating the technical feasibility of a particular technology</li><!-- /wp:list-item --><!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --><!-- wp:list-item --><li>Gaining operational experience and economic information</li><!-- /wp:list-item --><!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --><!-- wp:list-item --><li>Gathering data to support the development of large scale projects</li><!-- /wp:list-item --><!-- /wp:list-item --></ul><!-- /wp:list --> <!-- /wp:acf/column-content --> <!-- /wp:acf/columns --> The purpose of this technical review is to provide an overview of the major on-going Demo CCS projects applied to SMR Hydrogen Plants with a focus on the CO<sub>2 </sub>capture system. In particular, the technical approach used for the design and execution of the Demo Plants and the relevant peculiarities are outlined.

Technical Review

IEA CCS Build Out Unit

  • 1 June 2017
  • Industry Insights

This study compares the anticipated CCS build-out rates with those achieved in other sectors, where comparable technologies in those sectors have been used as analogues. In particular, it addresses whether the build-out rates for CCS, as depicted in Figure ES.1, are tenable, i.e. whether the claimed build out is possible once the programme is up and underway. It does not attempt to address the timing of when the build-out would begin or, more particularly, the veracity of the timing of the start of build-out as depicted in Figure ES.1.

Technical Review

ReCAP Project Understanding Cost of Retrofitting

  • 1 August 2017
  • Costs of CCUS
  • Industry Insights

The main purpose of the study was to evaluate the cost of retrofitting CO2 capture in a range of refinery types typical of those found in Europe. These included bo0th simple and high complexity refineries covering typical European refinery capacities from 100,000 to 350,000 bbl/d.  The assessments performed in this report focused on retrofit costs including modifications in the refineries, interconnections, and additional CHP and utility facilities. The main focus of the study was on CO2 capture from refinery Base Case 4, which was considered to be the most relevant reference for existing European refineries of interest for CO2 capture retrofit. Considering the large number of cases (16) and their complexity, a hybrid methodology is used to evaluate the cost of the sections (CO2 capture and compression, utilities, and interconnecting) of the concept. In this approach, four of the 16 capture cases were selected to represent a wide range of CO2 capture capacity and flue gas CO2 content. In each case, detailed assessments were undertaken. These detailed cost assessments form, based on subsequent scaling, the basis for the assessment of the other cases. The scaling equations have a larger purpose in that they can be used by refineries/policy experts to evaluate capital costs of retrofitting CO2 capture to refineries of interest.

Technical Review

Gas Supply Chain Emissions

  • 1 October 2017
  • Industry Insights

This technical review has been undertaken with the aim of providing a summary of the current status of research into greenhouse gas emissions in the natural gas supply chain. Although 90% or more of the CO<sub>2</sub> produced at gas fired power plants can be captured, emissions from the supply chain may reduce the near-zero-emission image of gas as an energy source. Emissions are predominantly from two sources: <ol> <!-- wp:list-item --><!-- wp:list-item --><li>Methane emissions during production and also fugitive emissions during transport.</li><!-- /wp:list-item --><!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --><!-- wp:list-item --><li>CO<sub>2</sub> emissions from gas production installations, gas purification plants, pipeline compressors, LNG liquefaction plants, ships and receiving terminals.</li><!-- /wp:list-item --><!-- /wp:list-item --> </ol>

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